05.29.15

IN WAKE OF MEMORIAL DAY, SCHUMER BACKS SYRACUSE FATHER’S PUSH TO GET SON’S NAME ON VIETNAM MEMORIAL WALL – LARRY REILLY JR. DIED IN VIETNAM WAR TRAINING EXERCISE IN SOUTH CHINA SEA IN 1969, BUT BECAUSE ACCIDENT WAS OUTSIDE COMBAT ZONE, HE & 73 OTHER VETERANS WHO PERISHED WERE LEFT OFF NATIONAL MEMORIAL WALL

Larry Reilly Jr. & 73 Other American Veterans Tragically Died When USS Frank E. Evans Collided With an Australian Aircraft Carrier in South China Sea in June 1969, But Because The Training Exercise Was Deemed “Not Directly Linked to War,” These 74 Names Were Not Recognized on Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Schumer Says These 74 Americans, Including Reilly, Bravely Served Their Country Inside & Outside The Combat Zone; Adding the Names of These Heroes to the Vietnam Memorial is the Proper Acknowledgement For Their Courage & Service

Schumer: Engrave Larry Reilly Jr. & 73 Other Vietnam Vets’ Names on National Memorial; They Gave the Ultimate Sacrifice for America and Deserve Memorial Honor

In wake of Memorial Day, U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer today launched his push to have the names of 74 Americans enshrined on the national Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC. Schumer explained that these Americans bravely served their country during the Vietnam War and died tragically in a Vietnam War-related training exercise in the South China Sea. Larry Reilly Sr., the father of one of those who perished, Larry Reilly Jr., is a Syracuse-area resident.

On June 3, 1969, the USS Frank E. Evans was cut in half after it collided with an Australian aircraft carrier during a joint naval exercise in the South China Sea. Seventy-four American sailors killed in the wreckage. However, because the tragedy took place outside of the official Vietnamese combat zone, the crew was deemed ineligible for inclusion on the Vietnamese Veterans Memorial. Schumer said that these geographical lines should not supersede recognition when it comes to service. Therefore, Schumer has launched his push to have the names of these crewmembers, including Reilly, properly enshrined on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in order to honor their memory, bravery and service.

“It is a mistake and an injustice that 74 veterans, including Larry Reilly Jr. bravely served their country in the Vietnam War and cannot be recognized on the national Vietnam Memorial Wall because of an overly strict and inflexible interpretation of a bureaucratic rule. These sailors served their country well, both inside and outside the combat zone, and the collision that caused these brave Americans to lose their lives should be considered directly linked to the war,” said Schumer. “I am launching my push to have these crewmembers names’ enshrined on the memorial to give these veterans the honor they deserve. Next Memorial Day, we should be able to look at 74 additional names on the Vietnam Memorial Wall in our nation’s capital.”

Schumer said those aboard the USS Frank E. Evans were essential to the American military efforts in Vietnam, and their presence in the South China Sea was a directly linked to the war. By withholding their names from enshrinement upon the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Schumer said the U.S. is denying the deceased crewmembers proper recognition for their bravery, sacrifice and noble service.

Schumer said he is supporting the ongoing efforts of Syracuse resident Larry Reilly Sr. to have his son’s name – Larry Reilly Jr. – included in the national memorial. Schumer said Reilly Sr. is a survivor of the USS Frank E. Evans collision. His son, along with 73 other crewmembers, tragically lost their lives while helping to advance American military efforts in Vietnam. Schumer said their combat-related service deserves acknowledgment upon the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall.  

Schumer said there were four crewmembers on the ship who were also born in NY and lost in the accident in 1969. Schumer said these men are included in the list of 74 sailors he is pushing to have engraved in the Vietnam Memorial Wall. They include: James Franklin Bradly, born in New York, NY; Terry Lee Henderson, born in Buffalo, NY; Dennis Ralph Johnson, born in Tarrytown, NY; and John Townsend Norton, born in Brooklyn, NY.

A copy of Senator Schumer’s letter to the Department of Defense appears below:

Dear Secretary Mabus,

I am writing to recommend that the names of the seventy-four sailors lost aboard the USS Frank E. Evans on June 3, 1969 be added to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Those aboard were essential to the American military efforts in Vietnam, and their presence in the South China Sea was a directly linked to the war. By withholding their names from enshrinement upon the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, we are denying the deceased crewmembers of the USS Frank E. Evans proper recognition for their brave and noble service.

Just a few days after it provided fire for ground troops in Vietnamese waters, the USS Frank E. Evans was cut in half after it collided with an Australian aircraft carrier during a joint naval exercise in the South China Sea. Seventy-four American sailors – all of which were likely to return to the conflict after the exercise – were killed in the wreckage. However, because the tragedy took place outside of the official Vietnamese combat zone, the crew was ineligible for inclusion on the Vietnamese Veterans Memorial.

For years, surviving crewmembers and relatives of the lost have struggled to understand why geographical lines supersede recognition of service. Their combat-related service deserves acknowledgment upon the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall.   

I urge you to give full consideration to this request and if you have any further questions, please contact my staff.  

Sincerely,

Charles E. Schumer

United States Senator

###

 



Previous Article Next Article